Beer Review: UNIBROUE CHAMBLY DE NOIRE

Beer Review: UNIBROUE CHAMBLY DE NOIRE

Unibroue pays homage to the valiant soldiers of the Carignan-Salières Regiment with their dark ale, Chambly de Noire, inspired by the regiment’s iconic black musketeer hats. Sent by King Louis XIV in 1665 to defend New France against the Iroquois, these soldiers played a crucial role in establishing strategic forts, notably Fort Chambly along the Richelieu River, laying the foundation for the peace and prosperity of the colony – a heritage carried on by many French Canadians.

Appearance:

The Chambly de Noire pours a cola brown hue, presenting itself with a thin tan ring of bubbles encircling the glass. The visual appeal is straightforward, lacking any particularly striking or memorable characteristics.

Aroma:

The olfactory experience unveils notes of cherry pie filling intertwined with a spicy malt essence. The aromatic profile is intriguing but doesn’t venture into groundbreaking territory, offering a rather conventional sensory journey.

Taste:

The flavor profile initiates with a rapid burst of tart cherry, complemented by subtle undertones of light roast and bread crust. The culmination brings forth a finishing touch of a tart twang, creating a nuanced but not overly complex taste experience.

Mouthfeel:

With a pronounced carbonation level, the Chambly de Noire manifests as a medium-bodied beer. The texture delivers a tangible presence on the palate without reaching any extremes, contributing to a satisfactory yet unremarkable mouthfeel.

Overall:

In the grand scheme, the dominant characteristic that emerges is the prevalent cherry notes. Fortunately, this attribute is not overpowering or obnoxious, rendering the Chambly de Noire a highly drinkable option. While it may not leave an indelible mark in the world of craft beers, its agreeable nature makes it a suitable choice for those seeking a straightforward and enjoyable drinking experience.