Beer Review: SURLY HELL

Beer Review: SURLY HELL

Surly Hell emerges as a commendable addition to Surly Brewing’s repertoire, managing to capture the taste buds of even the discerning German palate. Described by one enthusiast as reminiscent of a traditional Zwickel Bier from Germany, this filtered and lager yeast-fermented creation strategically places American hops in the background, allowing the Pils malt sweetness and the inviting aroma of fresh bread to take center stage. The beer, aptly named Hell (Deutsch for light), presents itself with a hazy yellow-gold hue crowned by a white head that gracefully diminishes to a modest 1/8 inch cap.

In terms of aroma, the beer unfolds with notes of biscuity malt, wet husk, and a hint of grassy hops, evoking a sense of rustic authenticity. The taste profile follows suit, featuring a palette of pale breaddy malt and subtle hop spice. The low yet discernible bitterness is accompanied by a restrained malt sweetness, contributing to a balanced and nuanced flavor profile.

In the realm of mouthfeel, Surly Hell earns its place as a medium-bodied creation with an average level of carbonation. This characteristic, combined with its fiendishly drinkable nature, ensures a smooth and enjoyable drinking experience.

Conclusively, Surly Hell impresses with its wealth of flavor and distinctive character, all within the modest confines of a 4.5% craft lager. This brew succeeds in captivating the taste buds without requiring any Faustian bargains, making it a delightful and accessible choice for aficionados of well-crafted beers.