Beer Review: KARL STRAUSS 24TH ANNIVERSARY FLANDERS-STYLE ALE

Beer Review: KARL STRAUSS 24TH ANNIVERSARY FLANDERS-STYLE ALE

Karl Strauss, renowned for its brewing prowess, unveils the 24th Anniversary Flanders-style Ale as a notable addition to their expanding barrel-aging repertoire. The brainchild of their experimentation with sour beers, this offering is a bold twist on their Flan-diddly-anders. Segura, a key figure at Karl Strauss, describes it as a venture into the realm of sours—tart enough for aficionados yet approachable for novices. Crafting this celebratory Flanders-style ale involves a meticulous fusion of barrel-aged and freshly fermented sour beers, following Flemish traditions. The result is a complex libation boasting layers of tart cherry, pomegranate, currants, and a hint of toasted oak. With a 7.5% alcohol by volume (abv), it pairs harmoniously with soft cheeses, grilled meats, and sweet glazes.

Unveiling the Pour: A Visual Prelude

In the goblet, the 24th Anniversary Ale cascades with a vibrant amber tinted bronze, devoid of any substantial head, presenting only a subtle pin stripe encircling the top.

A Bouquet of Complexity: Aromas that Speak Volumes

Engage your senses as the fragrance of blush wine, oak, vanilla, and cork intertwine in a symphony that precedes the first sip.

Flavorful Notes: A Culinary Adventure

Embark on a journey of taste with prominent elements of big dusty oak, red wine vinegar, and dry toasty malt. The culmination is a tart finish that leaves a lasting impression.

The Sensory Experience: Full-Bodied Pleasure

This Flanders-style ale presents itself with a full-bodied texture and modest carbonation, enhancing the overall mouthfeel.

Final Verdict: A Triumph for Karl Strauss

In conclusion, the Karl Strauss 24th Anniversary Flanders-Style Ale stands out as a triumph. As someone who has sampled their previous attempts at sours without much enthusiasm, this offering left a lasting impression. The decision to pilot a red sour for a few years before its market debut appears to have paid off, making this beer a source of pride for Karl Strauss.