Beer Review: JESTER KING / BRUERY TERREUX SACRED VESSEL

Beer Review: JESTER KING / BRUERY TERREUX SACRED VESSEL

Sacred Vessel makes a grand entrance right from the start. The label, adorned with classical Greek red and black figure art, reminiscent of ancient Hellenic vessels, sets a tone of sophistication rarely seen in beer artwork. However, the beer’s carbonation is a bit lackluster, requiring some coaxing to produce a modest head. Pouring it into a wine glass reveals a hazy, deeper golden liquid with a thicker foam, creating an appealing visual.

Aroma

The initial olfactory experience is undeniably vinous, akin to a buttery California Chardonnay like Far Niente. At this stage, it’s a challenge to associate anything beer-related, which adds an intriguing layer to the experience. The aroma profile is bold, promising a departure from typical beer expectations.

Taste

The first sips of Sacred Vessel reaffirm its departure from traditional sour ales. The beer boasts a substantial body, with ample residual sugar allowing a burst of complex flavors. Notes of spiced dark orange, mulled red wine, cinnamon, tannic fruit skins, and ripe strawberry dominate the palate, resembling the characteristics of a robust red wine. Lactic acid takes center stage, providing a creamy, coating mouthfeel, while citric and acetic acids remain pleasantly elusive.

Mouthfeel

Clocking in at nearly 10% ABV, Sacred Vessel doesn’t shy away from its alcohol content. The sugar level, a departure from the norm in most sours, sits at a noteworthy 4/10, while acidity is commendably toned down to 5/10. The mouthfeel is creamy and substantial, a stark contrast to the usual lightness associated with sour beers.

Overall

Sacred Vessel challenges expectations, delivering a beer experience that contradicts its appearance. With bold, tannic, and substantial characteristics, it stands out in the realm of sour ales. The unconventional choice of Roussanne and Viognier grapes adds depth, creating a unique flavor profile rarely explored in the beer world. While lacking the finesse of some counterparts, Sacred Vessel earns its place as a cutting-edge milestone for both Jester King and Bruery Terreux.

In conclusion, for enthusiasts seeking a shockingly distinctive taste, Sacred Vessel is a must-try. Its appeal extends to wine lovers, offering a rare integration of special grape varietals not commonly found in beer. While not a “perfect” sour, its sheer uniqueness cements its status as a groundbreaking creation.