Beer Review: EVIL TWIN SUMO IN A SIDECAR

Beer Review: EVIL TWIN SUMO IN A SIDECAR

Upon pouring Evil Twin’s Sumo in a Sidecar into a specialty glass, the initial presentation is crystal clear and bright straw in color. However, a less-than-ideal encounter with substantial yeast chunks towards the end of the can introduces a cloudiness to the beer. Head formation, typical for a hoppy style, proves weaker than expected, as does head retention.

Aroma

The aroma journey kicks off with notes reminiscent of fresh pineapple soft serve and pineapple upside-down cake. As the beer warms, nuances of honeysuckle and sweet tupelo honey emerge, yet the promised apricot element remains elusive. Instead, there’s a sweetness that leans toward dessert-like qualities, leaving the anticipated apricot identity in the background.

Taste

Sumo begins with a subtle sweetness at the front of the palate, where dried fruit flavors make a modest appearance without overwhelming the taste buds. The sweetness, however, escalates to a level that feels a tad excessive, akin to the addition of high-quality honey. Notably, the bitterness is conspicuously absent, creating an experience that aligns more with a fruit blonde ale than the anticipated “fruit IPA.”

Mouthfeel

The mouthfeel is a highlight, featuring a solid foundation of sweet Hawaiian rolls and fresh bread. The beer carries a rich body, incorporating honey, a discernible alcohol presence, white sugar, and hints of yellow apple. However, it accentuates its dessert character to the point where the anticipated refreshing quality of an IPA with apricots is overshadowed.

Overall

While Sumo in a Sidecar is enjoyable, it prompts a desire for a version with brighter fruit character, reduced sweetness, and heightened bitterness. This inclination, however, acknowledges the beer’s fidelity to its inspiration—a specific cocktail. In contrast to Stone’s Vengeful Spirit, notorious for its divisive bitterness, Sumo proves approachable to a broad audience. Craft beer newcomers, in particular, may appreciate its soft body, low bitterness, moderate ABV, and a sweet dessert profile that remains within reasonable bounds.

In the realm of cocktail bars, ordering a Sumo in a Sidecar might just be the right call for the next round.