Beer Review: BROOKLYN SORACHI ACE

Beer Review: BROOKLYN SORACHI ACE

The initial visual impression of Brooklyn Sorachi Ace is a murky dark yellow gold, accompanied by a generous and effervescent white head. However, the head’s swift disappearance raises questions about its longevity and stability over time, detracting from the overall presentation.

Aroma

The aroma of this classic saison is characterized by a prominent fruity bouquet, featuring distinct notes of orange zest and a hint of white wine. The herbal hop presence is undeniable, creating an aromatic profile that is both bold and inviting.

Taste

Upon tasting, the beer unfolds a mosaic of flavors. The bitter spiciness of the hops takes center stage, complemented by the dryness of pale malt. The fruity yeast adds an additional layer of complexity, contributing to a crisp and bitter finish. While the flavor profile is intriguing, it may border on overwhelming for those seeking a more balanced palate.

Mouthfeel

The mouthfeel of Brooklyn Sorachi Ace leans towards the full-bodied spectrum, tipping slightly on the heavy side. The moderate carbonation attempts to lift the weight, but the overall sensation lacks the refreshing crispness that many seek in a saison. The choice of a heavier mouthfeel could be divisive, as it may not align with the expectations of those who prefer a lighter and more invigorating experience.

Overall

Brooklyn Sorachi Ace, a saison boasting the rarity of Sorachi Ace hops from an exclusive Oregon farm, presents a complex profile. While the beer offers a unique journey through bitter hops, dry malt, and fruity yeast, it falls short in aspects of appearance and mouthfeel. The rapid dissipation of the head and the weightiness in the mouth detract from the overall drinking experience. Despite these drawbacks, the beer showcases craftsmanship, especially in its bottle re-fermentation with Champagne yeast, resulting in fine carbonation and a pleasing foam. As a niche offering, it may captivate the palates of those seeking a departure from traditional saisons, but its idiosyncrasies may not resonate with a broader audience.